Skip to main content

📌 CLINIC NEWS & UPDATES: 👇🏽

Todays Trending Topic ♛

Environmental Factors Behind Thyroid Disease | Wellness Clinic

The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ located in the base of the neck. It's in charge of releasing essential thyroid hormones which control the body's metabolism, the way the body uses energy. The thyroid gland's hormones regulate vital body functions, such as breathing, heart rate, central and peripheral nervous systems, body temperature and more.

What causes autoimmune thyroid disease?
As essential as the thyroid gland is, however, the body's own immune system can sometimes malfunction and attack this important endocrine organ, ultimately affecting its function. Autoimmune thyroid diseases, like Hashimoto's thyroid disease and Graves' disease, have been on the rise in the United States. While the diagnosis of thyroid disease has increased, many doctors still don't know the cause of the issue, but these have been linked to several factors.

Environmental Factors for AITD
A number of environmental factors have been associated with the development an…

Romanian Deadlift Vs. Standard Deadlift: Comprehensive Guide


By Kyran Doyle In Training

Deadlifts are one of the best strength and mass building exercises that you can perform.
When performing the deadlift you are working more muscles than any other exercise, including the squat.

Deadlifts have many different variations and forms. In this article we are going to focus on the difference between the Romanian Deadlift and standard deadlifts.

There are lots of valid arguments as to which exercise is better in a Romanian Deadlift vs regular deadlift battle.

Keep reading to learn the differences.

Romanian Deadlift Vs. Standard Deadlift

The Romanian Deadlift is one of the most commonly used among the various deadlift techniques.
In fact a lot of people that think they are performing a deadlift are sometimes actually doing a Romanian Deadlift.

Both the conventional and Romanian Deadlifts are great strength and muscle building exercises.
Even though they are both deadlifts variations the setup, execution and muscles activated are different.

Here’s a quick video that highlights the differences in form and setup between the two.


Regular Deadlift

As the name suggests the deadlift is a strength training exercise that involves lifting dead weight.

The regular deadlift is one of the best total body exercises you can do as it works just about every fiber in your body.

The deadlift requires you to lift a weight off the ground and lower it back down again. Although it may sound simple there is a lot going on in the movement and incorrect form can cause injuries.

One of the most common causes for injury while deadlifting is rounding the back. Your lower back must stay neutral during the whole movement. Rounding your lower back during heavy deadlifts puts uneven pressure on your spine. Always lift with a neutral lower back, allowing for the natural inward curve of your lower spine.


romanian-deadlift-vs-deadlift 2
Original Image from Stack.com

Don’t try and rush to lift heavier weights. the quickest way to improve your deadlift is through correct form. By pulling more efficiently you can use more muscles and deadlift heavier. So start out practicing correct form and build your way up.

The best way to approach the exercise is to think as if you were leg pressing the floor as opposed to using your upper body to lift something. This will help you mentally focus on using your legs rather than your back (which can cause rounding) for the exercise.

The “dead” in deadlift stands for dead weight so each rep must start on the floor, from a dead stop.  Deadlifts are different to other exercises like the bench press or squat where the weight starts at the top. The deadlift movement starts from the bottom and and you pull the weight up then return it to the floor for one rep.

Here are Stronglifts 5 steps to proper deadlift form:
  1. Walk to the bar. Stand with your mid-foot under the bar. Your shins shouldn’t touch it yet. Put your heels hip-width apart, narrower than on Squats. Point your toes out 15°.
  2. Grab the bar. Bend over without bending your legs. Grip the bar narrow, about shoulder-width apart like on the Overhead Press. Your arms must be vertical when looking from the front.
  3. Bend your knees. Drop into position by bending your knees until your shins touch the bar. Do NOT let the bar move away from your mid-foot. If it moves, start from scratch with step one.
  4. Lift your chest. Straighten your back by raising you chest. Do not change your position – keep the bar over your mid-foot, your shins against the bar, and your hips where they are.
  5. Pull. Take a big breath, hold it and stand up with the weight. Keep the bar in contact with your legs while you pull. Don’t shrug or lean back at the top.
Lower the bar by moving your hips back while keeping your legs almost straight. Once the bar is past your knees, bend your legs more. The bar will land over your mid-foot, ready for your next rep.

Rest a second between reps while staying in the setup position. Take a deep breath, get tight and pull again. Every rep must start from a dead stop on the floor. Don’t bounce the weight off the floor or you can end up lifting with bad form.

read more button

Today's Chiropractic

Trending: Back Pain Insights

Location Near You

MEET THE STAFF