Skip to main content

Todays Trending Topic ♛

How To Use Occlusion Training To Enhance Your Workouts

By Kyran Doyle  In Training
Occlusion training or blood flow restriction training has been getting a lot of attention lately.
You might be wondering if it is something that you should implement into your workouts or if it is something to steer clear of.
As with just about every fitness strategy there are two sides to the argument.
Some people say that is brings no benefits and then there are others that claim that it can enhance muscle growth and aid your workouts.
In this article you will learn exactly what blood flow restriction (occlusion) training is, how effective it is, and how you can use it in your workouts. WHAT IS OCCLUSION TRAINING?
Occlusion training involves restricting the flow of blood to a muscle group while training. That is why it is also commonly called “blood flow restriction training.”
Basically you take a wrap or band and apply it to the top of your limb.
The aim of this isn’t to completely cut off circulation to the area as that is dangerous and painful.
This means that y…

Veteran Affairs Helps Veterans Achieve Whole Health Goals

Veteran Affairs Helps Veterans Achieve Whole Health Goals - El Paso Chiropractor
For Questions Call/Text Dr. Jimenez Personally @ 915-540-8444 or Contact Us @ 915-850-0900

Tracy Gaudet, MD, director of the VA’s Office of Patient-Centered Care and Cultural Transformation, has been inspired to change her approach to medicine as well as transform care at the Veteran Affairs Medical Clinics. Gaudet is in charge of the effort to establish the VA’s focus on allowing veterans, whether ill or well, to enhance their health and thoroughly achieve their overall well-being goals.

“Healthcare in the U.S. and the VA has operated on a ‘find it, fix it’ reactive disease model,” Gaudet said in a recent interview. “What we’re undertaking is truly a paradigm shift that promotes health and wellness.”

As compared to initiating with a patient’s suggested complication or attempting to identify a condition early in its development, Tracy Gaudet believes healthcare providers should begin by understanding the veteran and their ambitions. She explains that medical staff at the VA shouldn’t be asking, “what’s the matter?”, rather, they should be asking, “what matters to you?”. The goal of complete health at the VA is to assist all veterans in order to determine their basic health achievement goals and desires and to also help them focus on all the areas of their lives that affect their health and don’t allow them to reach those goals.

“It’s not just a ‘feel good’ program,” Gaudet noted, “but an approach informed by evidence that makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches as well as emphasizing self-care at all points along the spectrum of health and disease.”

This approach often takes veterans out of the clinic. The nine-week, peer-to-peer program emphasizes on guiding veterans through various questions to encourage them to discuss why they want to be healthy, what they want to accomplish and the kinds of relationships they want to have. According to Tracy Gaudet, the results have been astounding. Many veterans have found meaning and purpose in their lives again and connected to healthier lifestyles through these new programs being available at Veterans Affairs clinics. Veterans can then follow through with other available programs to help them reduce stress like meditation or they can increase their overall fitness levels. Additionally, as their health improves, the cost of caring for them drops. The complete health approach encourages veterans to make continuous changes in their health and life which may involve working on their closest relationships.

The Office of Patient-Centered Care and Cultural Transformation (OPCC&CT) is directed to classify these innovative programs throughout the VA and determine whether they can be implemented across the entire system and facilitate their performance. It will also implement new programs on a national basis.

Despite the operational and infrastructure challenges, the VA has already established a majority of the fundamentals for the transformation of care at the heart of the integrated, whole health approach.

Five existing facilities in Los Angeles, Dallas, Washington, Birmingham, AL, and East Orange, NJ, have become Centers of Innovation, combined with primary care and mental health services as well as alternative programs, such as yoga, meditation, Qigong and Tai Chi. These centers have already received a wide range of programs to address whole health. For example, a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction program found on the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System has assisted veterans to overcome pain and substance abuse. The East Orange New Jersey Healthcare System has introduced a demonstration kitchen and an outdoor program to support healthier eating and engagement with nature, while the Washington center is bringing in virtual online integrative health services and information.

The local El Paso Veterans Affairs Healthcare System also has a variety of similar programs available for veterans and active duty military members alike. As a part of the veteran’s Medical Benefits Package, chiropractic services are now being required as an alternative treatment method to relieve musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Chiropractic care focuses on restoring an individuals natural state of well being through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations to gradually rehabilitate patients and improve their body’s optimal health. A chiropractor can carefully diagnose the underlying cause of an individual’s symptoms and follow through with the proper treatment to strengthen and improve the mobility of the joints by aligning the spine and stretching the structures surrounding the spinal bones. Along with a basic set of exercises, chiropractic treatment can ultimately improve the overall health and wellness of many veterans as well as help them achieve their desired physical and mental goals.

By Dr. Alex Jimenez




For Additional Information:





Popular posts from this blog

Pain in the Quadratus Lumborum Muscle

A majority of the population have at some point experienced low back pain in their lifetimes. Although low back pain is recognized to result from numerous conditions or injuries on the lumbar spine, muscle strains such as a quadratus lumborum muscle strain, are believed to be a leading cause for the recognizable symptoms of pain and discomfort.
The quadratus lumborum muscle is a sizable muscle in the shape of a triangle, located deep on each respective side of the lower back. The role of the wide muscular tissue is to grant mobility to the lumbar spine in sequence for the torso to move laterally from side to side as well as extend and stabilize the lower spine to improve posture. When this muscle is strained or pulled, the symptoms can restrict movement on the lower back and since the muscular tissue is so extensive, recovery from this type of injury usually requires more time and patience to fully heal.


Quadratus Lumborum Syndrome V.S. Facet Joint Syndrome
When symptoms of back pa…

Achilles Tendon Injury

Achilles tendonitis is a medical term used to describe a condition resulting in irritation of the large tendon, the Achilles tendon. Found in the back of the ankle, this condition is recognized as a common cause for injury among athletes. Excessive use of the Achilles tendon results in inflammation together with swelling and pain.
The development of Achilles tendonitis can be associated with two important factors, most frequently among athletes, which are, lack of flexibility and over-pronation. With age, the tendons will begin to lose flexibility, just the same as other tissues in the body. This change causes the tendons to become more rigid and more vulnerable to injury. For some people, the ankle may roll too far downward and inward with each step they take. This is called over-pronation, which places more stress on the tendons and ligaments of the foot, contributing to injury if not corrected.
Achilles tendonitis may also develop from other factors. An increase in an athlete’s …

5 Common Causes for Shoulder Pain

The shoulders are the most mobile joints in the human body. Because the ball of the humerus is designed to be larger than the shoulder socket that holds it, the shoulders need to be supported by muscles, tendons, and ligaments to secure them in a stable or natural position. Since the shoulder can be unstable, it is often a site for many common complications. Below are 5 common causes of shoulder pain and their associated symptoms.
Rotator Cuff Tear
Rotator cuff tears within the shoulder are a very common type of shoulder injury. The rotator cuff consists of a set of four muscles: the supraspinatus, the infraspinatus, the subscapularis, and the teres minor. All of these muscles are attached to the bones of the shoulders by tendons, which purspose is to support, stabilize, and grant the arm movement to move up, down and rotate. The rotator cuff ensures that the arm remains in the shoulder socket. Damage or injury from an accident or gradual wear and tear can result in inflammation to t…

Today's Chiropractic

Location Near You

MEET THE STAFF