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Chiropractic Care and Osteopathic Medicine | Eastside Chiropractor

Chiropractic is a healthcare profession dedicated to the nonsurgical treatment of disorders of the nervous system or musculoskeletal system. Chiropractors maintain a focus on therapy and spinal manipulation for structures.

Can chiropractic care be paired with other treatment methods?
Several studies have concluded that manual treatments commonly used by physicians are usually effective for treating lower back pain, lumbar herniated disc for radiculopathy and neck pain, as well as other ailments. In fact, when patients using non-invasive chronic low back pain have been treated by chiropractors, the long-term outcome is improved by obtaining maintenance spinal manipulation after the first intensive manipulative treatment. New research studies have found that a combination of chiropractic and other treatment modalities can help further provide relief.

Chiropractic and Osteopathic
Chiropractic and osteopathic medicine represent another non-surgical treatment option for patients with spin…

VA Increases Non-drug Alternatives for Chronic Pain

VA Increases Non-drug Alternatives for Chronic Pain - El Paso Chiropractor


Both acute and chronic pain related to trauma from an injury, have constantly been a common complication among troops. Fortunately, in recent years, efforts by the United States Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs officials to solve the issue of pain among active duty service members and veterans have started offering a larger variety of evidence-based treatment methods.

Lt. Col. Scott Griffith, MD, and Army’s pain management consultant, quoted in a recent interview, “Chronic pain can be very challenging so we focus a lot on their functionality, being able to restore their function as well as bringing their pain down to the extent that we can. Even for people who cannot have their pain eliminated, many of them can have an improvement in the quality of their life.”

For military healthcare providers, managing acute and chronic pain has become a tremendous problem than ever before. In a June 2014 report in JAMA Internal Medicine, of 2,597 evaluated individuals, researchers found that 44 percent of troops experienced chronic pain symptoms after being deployed for combat while 15.1% of those individuals reported regularly using opioids. Furthermore, Veterans Affairs administrators gave a testimony before a Congress hearing that chronic pain was among the most common medical complication in veterans returning from the last decade of conflict. The frequent cause for chronic pain is due to musculoskeletal injury, which is usually unrelated to battlefield wounds. Causes for musculoskeletal injury include training and job performance with the use of increasingly heavy protective equipment as well as sports and recreation.

The challenge for federal medicine providers still lies on relieving chronic pain symptoms among active duty military members and veterans while also decreasing the chance of opioid addiction and abuse among individuals. In 2003, the Defense & Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management (DVCIPM) was established to support and regulate pain research and education as well as improving pain management methods. Six years later, the Army surgeon general organized a pain task force membership that included representatives from military services, TRICARE and VHA, to give guidance and approval for a comprehensive pain management strategy. That same task force distributed a report in May 2010 recommending the military to use a holistic, multimodal and multidisciplinary approach to pain management, including complementary and alternative medicine.

Simultaneously, the research for non-drug methods to treating pain is still ongoing. VA and National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) declared that $21.7 million would be utilized for 13 different research projects over a period of five years to examine further non-drug approaches to managing pain and related health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, drug abuse, and sleep issues. The research will take place at academic institutions and VAMCs across the United States.

Josephine P. Briggs, MD, director of NCCAM, said in a written statement, “The need for non-drug treatment options is a significant and urgent public health imperative. We believe this research will provide much-needed information that will help our military and their family members, and ultimately anyone suffering from chronic pain and related conditions.”

Through the project, the VA will analyze the extent and cost-effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine utilization among veterans being treated at the Veterans Affairs Medical Clinics for musculoskeletal disorder-related pain and other related conditions. On a wider spectrum, changes in drug development are giving clinicians other means to helping active-duty service members and veterans as well as others avoid opioid addiction. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced it had approved new labeling for the third extended release opioid analgesic to be approved with abuse-deterrent properties, making them more difficult to abuse orally, which is the most common form of opioid abuse.

By Dr. Alex Jimenez




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