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Functional Medicine for Autoimmune Disease Prevention | Functional Chiropractor

Autoimmune disease affects up to 50 million Americans, according to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association. Why are so many people affected by these chronic pain conditions? There are a number of factors that may cause the human body to attack its own cells, some of which can be modified.

What lifestyle modifications can help improve autoimmune diseases?
Unfortunately, conventional treatment options often focus on solely relieving symptoms, in the belief that there are no cures for autoimmune diseases. However, autoimmune diseases still undergo cycles of flare-ups and remission. In accordance with Dr. Dempster, a healthcare professional in alternative treatment, functional medicine looks at your complete health picture by addressing fundamental factors of your biochemical, physical, and emotional well-being.

Why is this important? Your body naturally wants to become healthy and at a state of balance. Nonetheless, things occur to upset that balance. It's believed tha…

Back Pain Myths: Revealed


Myth 1: You Only Have To Sit Up Straight.

Back pain myths are like any other, however, your mom was not totally wrong; hunching can certainly be bad for your back. But the opposite is true as well. Strain can be also caused by sitting up for too long without a break. If you work make sure that your chair is at a height where your knees are at a 90-degree angle, your feet can rest flat on the ground, and you have back support. Make sure that you stand up, stretch, and take a walk several times each day to keep from becoming stiff or causing injury.

Myth 2: You Need The Firmest Mattress Possible.

Back pain sufferers can actually experience increased pain if their mattress is too firm since it puts more strain on heavy points like the hips and shoulders. On the other hand too soft a mattress could lack the support required to allow proper movement. In both instances, the person wakes up stiff and in pain. Studies show that a medium-firm mattress provides the right amount of support to help prevent injury.

Myth 3: Back Pain Is Caused By Exercise.

A poll by the North American Spine Society revealed this as the number one back pain myth. Sure, if you don't work out then try to win a competition, you could experience injury. You can help prevent back pain by preparing your body and workouts with proper warm-up and great stretching exercises. (Take a cue from professional athletes that factor stretching and warm ups in their everyday routine.) Strengthen your back by strengthen your core, through exercises focused on strengthening your stomach and back muscles as well as cardio.

Myth 4: Back Pain Is An Unavoidable Side-Effect Of Getting Older.

Getting older does not mean life has to be painful. While there are aches and pains that come with an aging body, staying physically healthy (see Myth #3) through exercises that keep our bodies strong, flexible and limber are a huge benefit. There are several exercise options to try, T’ai Chi, Pilates, yoga and treatment options which range from acupuncture to physical therapy to advanced treatment options both surgical and nonsurgical. Bottom line is you do not have to live with back pain.


Myth 5: Back Pain Came Out Of Nowhere.

Another back pain myth is sufferers often claim one wrong twist or simply bending over was the cause of their injury. But that was likely the result of several other factors. Overdoing a workout, using poor technique when lifting heavy objects, bad posture, and especially weight gain can all put strain on the spine and lead to "out of nowhere" spasms. As with more serious conditions such as joint and disk disorders a spine doctor is recommended to find the source of the pain.

Myth 6: A Hot Bath Can Bring Relief

There are few things as relaxing as a nice spa, but doing so after injuring your back may actually make your situation worse by increasing inflammation. Doctors recommend applying ice to the area for 20 minutes at a time during the first two or three times in order to reduce pain and inflammation. An exception, people who suffer from chronic pain can find relief taking a warm bath. Play it safe and check with your doctor for the best treatment.

Myth 7: If I See A Doctor, I'll Probably Have Surgery.

Most people will experience some level of back pain in their lifetime, but the overwhelming majority will find relief through modifications such as over the counter anti-inflammatory medicines, exercise, physical therapy, or even just by waiting it out. In actuality, spine surgery is recommended for a small percentage of patients and until all other treatment methods have been tried. These patients often suffer from degenerative spine or joint problems that cause pain that is chronic. Whether you understand the origin of your pain or not, a fear of surgery shouldn't prevent you from seeking medical help.
F4C Jerry Rice Poster

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