Skip to main content

Todays Trending Topic ♛

Exercise Reduces Symptoms from Fibromyalgia | Central Chiropractor

Fibromyalgia is a mysterious disorder that has been misunderstood for many years, however, there are lots of treatment options available to relieve its symptoms. When it comes to fibromyalgia, exercise can be beneficial to relieve it.

How does exercise help fibromyalgia?
Exercise will be an essential part of fibromyalgia therapy, although your chronic pain and fatigue may make exercising seem excruciating. Physical activity reduces symptoms such as fatigue, depression, and can even help you sleep better. Exercise can be a fundamental part of managing your symptoms.

Exercise for Fibromyalgia
Getting regular physical activity 30 minutes per day, helps reduce perceptions of pain in people with fibromyalgia, according to a 2010 study published in Arthritis Research & Therapy. The signs of fibromyalgia may make exercising a challenge, although exercise is a commonly prescribed treatment for chronic pain.

During a research study, the research team separated 84 minimally active patients…

Injury Risk May Rise When Kids Play Just One Sport



Focusing too much on playing one favorite sport probably isn’t a good idea for kids under 12, researchers report.

That’s because specializing in a single sport seems to increase a child’s risk of injury, researchers say.

“Young athletes should participate in one competitive sport per season, and take at least three months off (non-consecutive) from competition per year,” said the study’s leader, Dr. Neeru Jayanthi. He’s a physician with Emory Sports Medicine and an associate professor of orthopaedics and family medicine at Emory University in Atlanta.

For the study, Jayanthi’s team assessed the risk of sports-related injuries among nearly 1,200 young athletes. After tracking their training schedules over the course of three years, the investigators found that nearly 40 percent of the athletes suffered an injury during the study period.

The findings also showed that injured athletes began specializing in one sport at an average age younger than 12 years. In addition, nearly two-thirds of these athletes in highly specialized sports sustained a repeat injury.

Athletes who didn’t sustain injuries began to focus on one sport when they were older than 12, on average, according to the report.

“While different for each sport, determining a possible age of specialization, as well as other training factors, may help guide young athletes in reducing risk,” Jayanthi said in an Emory news release.

Young athletes who had sports-related injuries during the study period tended to play more year-round sports, played more organized sports each week and were more specialized in specific sports than those who didn’t have an injury, the researchers found.

The study authors advise young athletes to play more than one sport. In addition, they said, younger children shouldn’t train more hours than their age each week.

The study was published online March 16 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The findings were also presented Thursday at the International Olympic Committee World Conference on Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport, in Monaco.


News stories are written and provided by HealthDay and do not reflect federal policy, the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Popular posts from this blog

Pain in the Quadratus Lumborum Muscle

A majority of the population have at some point experienced low back pain in their lifetimes. Although low back pain is recognized to result from numerous conditions or injuries on the lumbar spine, muscle strains such as a quadratus lumborum muscle strain, are believed to be a leading cause for the recognizable symptoms of pain and discomfort.
The quadratus lumborum muscle is a sizable muscle in the shape of a triangle, located deep on each respective side of the lower back. The role of the wide muscular tissue is to grant mobility to the lumbar spine in sequence for the torso to move laterally from side to side as well as extend and stabilize the lower spine to improve posture. When this muscle is strained or pulled, the symptoms can restrict movement on the lower back and since the muscular tissue is so extensive, recovery from this type of injury usually requires more time and patience to fully heal.


Quadratus Lumborum Syndrome V.S. Facet Joint Syndrome
When symptoms of back pa…

Achilles Tendon Injury

Achilles tendonitis is a medical term used to describe a condition resulting in irritation of the large tendon, the Achilles tendon. Found in the back of the ankle, this condition is recognized as a common cause for injury among athletes. Excessive use of the Achilles tendon results in inflammation together with swelling and pain.
The development of Achilles tendonitis can be associated with two important factors, most frequently among athletes, which are, lack of flexibility and over-pronation. With age, the tendons will begin to lose flexibility, just the same as other tissues in the body. This change causes the tendons to become more rigid and more vulnerable to injury. For some people, the ankle may roll too far downward and inward with each step they take. This is called over-pronation, which places more stress on the tendons and ligaments of the foot, contributing to injury if not corrected.
Achilles tendonitis may also develop from other factors. An increase in an athlete’s …

5 Common Causes for Shoulder Pain

The shoulders are the most mobile joints in the human body. Because the ball of the humerus is designed to be larger than the shoulder socket that holds it, the shoulders need to be supported by muscles, tendons, and ligaments to secure them in a stable or natural position. Since the shoulder can be unstable, it is often a site for many common complications. Below are 5 common causes of shoulder pain and their associated symptoms.
Rotator Cuff Tear
Rotator cuff tears within the shoulder are a very common type of shoulder injury. The rotator cuff consists of a set of four muscles: the supraspinatus, the infraspinatus, the subscapularis, and the teres minor. All of these muscles are attached to the bones of the shoulders by tendons, which purspose is to support, stabilize, and grant the arm movement to move up, down and rotate. The rotator cuff ensures that the arm remains in the shoulder socket. Damage or injury from an accident or gradual wear and tear can result in inflammation to t…

Today's Chiropractic

Location Near You

Community: Google+ Followers 10K+