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How Psychologists Help Fibromyalgia Patients | Central Chiropractor

About 30% of people with fibromyalgia experience nervousness, depression, or some form of mood disturbance. Researchers have not yet determined whether fibromyalgia causes these conditions or vice versa, but what has become clear is that when your psychological state succumbs to your physical pain, your pain gets stronger. That's why your physician may recommend you seek a psychiatrist, psychologist, or a counselor.

How can mental and emotional support help with fibromyalgia?
Fibromyalgia is a complex condition. Its symptoms will often impact your life in a way that transcend pain and are varied. The pain and fatigue alone could be sufficient to negatively alter your lifestyle, thus affecting your mood. To take control of your symptoms, you may have to have a multi-disciplinary strategy, incorporating psychology, physical therapy, and medications, to help provide overall relief from all fibromyalgia symptoms.

The Difference Between Anxiety and Depression
Many individuals frequent…

Back Strains & Sprains Center







Oh, My Aching Back! Back Sprains and Strains and How to Treat Them

About 80% of us experience back pain of some kind during our lifetime. In many cases, pain occurs in the lumbar spine (the lower back), because this really is the region that carries the most weight, particularly when moving, twisting, and bending. Back sprains are caused when ligaments—the tough bands of tissue that hold bones together —become overstretched or torn. Back strains demand a muscle or tendon. Nonetheless, lots of times the source of the pain cannot be clearly defined. The pain persists, although occasionally harm or the ailment that triggered the pain might be cured.


How Back Sprains and Pull Can Occur






A back sprain or strain can happen when you play a strenuous sport, lift an excessive amount of weight, or even bend or twist during the course of a regular day. Whether it’s a sprain or a strain, the effect is muscle spasms, which can be quite debilitating to activities of day-to-day living and an individual’s movement: Soft tissues become inflamed and cause pain.

The pain could be tingling, stinging, stabbing, aching, sharp, or dull. It can endure for a few weeks, or go on for months, becoming long-term with more serious implications.

Ligaments in the Spine (Below)





There are three types of muscles that support the back:


Extensors (back and gluteal muscles), flexors (abdominal and iliopsoas muscles), and obliques or rotators (side muscles). Through a complicated system of nerves, muscle pain or muscle stiffness may develop in the low back, which can limit your range of motion. Muscle spasms may change inability to stand up right or your ordinary pose.


Is an X ray or other diagnostic test crucial?


At that point, your doctor will want to eliminate any inherent causes of back pain like a disc injury or a pinched nerve. Your physician may order an X ray, CT Scan, or an MRI to examine joints, the vertebrae, spinal cord, and nerve roots. Early diagnosis and treatment might help prevent extreme pain from becoming chronic.


First Treatment


However, bed rest ought to be restricted because, when prolonged, it can cause loss of muscle mass and stamina. Your doctor may recommend a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), pain medicine and physical therapy (PT).

An organized system of PT may include electrical muscle stimulation, mild massage, ice and heat treatment, pelvic traction, core strengthening and stretching. Your doctor may prescribe a blend of two or more treatments.

  • Physical Therapy: This consists of patient instruction, and also a variety of strengthening and stretches exercises, often centered on the core of the body, that the patient can continue at home.

  • Medications: These can broadly vary. NSAIDs are helpful to lessen pain related to swelling (inflammation). Muscle relaxants can help calm spasms. In some instances, antidepressants and antiseizure drugs might help reduce nerve-associated pain. Nevertheless, check by means of your physician first because these medicines may have side effects or interact with other medicines you take.

  • Coping Skills: Coping skills are very important when handling back pain—or, for that matter, any type of pain. Realize how you interact with others and that pain can affect your mood.

  • Complementary Medicine: Acupuncture and biofeedback are common types of treatment in this group and might be recommended by your doctor.


Put Good Posture to Work


Since we spend so many hours at work, many back injuries can occur at a desk, especially if you sit at a computer for most of the day.

  • Practice safe sitting, upright with your back and shoulders against the back of the seat, feet firmly on the floor

  • Sit in a well-constructed, ergonomic chair with good back support

  • Make use of a desk that is secure; 28”–30” over the floor

  • Tilt your keyboard down and slightly away from you for better wrist position


Here’s the Great News!


More than 90% of patients completely recover from lumbar muscle sprain or strain in a month. After that, heat and ice treatments are suggested as necessary to manage flare-ups, along with an antiinflammatory medication.


  • Keep in mind that low back sprain or strain can develop into a recurring condition if you don’t change the customs that cause or lead to it.

  • Speak with your physician or physical therapist about specific exercises you can do to reinforce your core muscles—such as your abdominal muscles to help stabilize your spine.

  • Swimming, yoga, stationary bicycling, and brisk walking are all advantageous to help to keep your spine healthy.

  • Aim to maintain a healthy body weight. Since your lumbar spine doesn’t have extra weight to go even 5 to 10 pounds can give rise to a change in back pain.

  • If you smoke, stop! Those who smoke are at greater risk for back pain and degenerative disc disorders and recover more slowly.

  • Manage anxiety.

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