Skip to main content

Todays Trending Topic ♛

Exercise Reduces Symptoms from Fibromyalgia | Central Chiropractor

Fibromyalgia is a mysterious disorder that has been misunderstood for many years, however, there are lots of treatment options available to relieve its symptoms. When it comes to fibromyalgia, exercise can be beneficial to relieve it.

How does exercise help fibromyalgia?
Exercise will be an essential part of fibromyalgia therapy, although your chronic pain and fatigue may make exercising seem excruciating. Physical activity reduces symptoms such as fatigue, depression, and can even help you sleep better. Exercise can be a fundamental part of managing your symptoms.

Exercise for Fibromyalgia
Getting regular physical activity 30 minutes per day, helps reduce perceptions of pain in people with fibromyalgia, according to a 2010 study published in Arthritis Research & Therapy. The signs of fibromyalgia may make exercising a challenge, although exercise is a commonly prescribed treatment for chronic pain.

During a research study, the research team separated 84 minimally active patients…

Exercise: The Cellular Fountain of Youth

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) — High-intensity exercise may help older adults reverse certain aspects of the “cellular” aging process, a new study suggests.


It’s no secret that regular exercise is healthy for young and old alike. But researchers said the new findings point to particular benefits from “high-intensity interval training” for older adults.


That’s the type of workout that combines brief bursts of vigorous exercise with periods of moderate activity: A person might, for example, go all-out on a stationary bike for a few minutes, ease up for the next few, and then start again.


In this study, older adults who performed that type of exercise showed greater changes at the cellular level, compared to those who worked out more moderately.


Specifically, interval training gave a bigger boost to mitochondrial function in the muscle. Mitochondria are the “powerhouses” within body cells that break down nutrients to be used for energy.


The training also revved up activity in more genes related to mitochondrial function and muscle growth.


What does it all mean?


The study findings suggest that interval training can turn back the clock in ways that moderate aerobic exercise and strength training do not, according to lead researcher Dr. K. Sreekumaran Nair.


But, he stressed, the findings do not mean older adults should jump into a vigorous exercise regimen.


“If you’re sedentary, you should talk to your doctor before you start exercising,” said Nair. He’s an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.


“And then,” he said, “you can start with walking, and build yourself up to a fast pace.”


For older adults who want to progress to a more-intense regimen, Nair said, it’s best to start with supervision. But he also stressed that intense exercise is not a must. “Any regular exercise will bring health benefits — absolutely,” he added.


This study demonstrated that, he pointed out. Even though interval training had the biggest effects on aspects of cellular aging, other types of exercise boosted older adults’ fitness levels and muscle strength.


The study, published recently in Cell Metabolism, involved 72 younger and older adults who were sedentary.


Nair’s team randomly assigned each of them to one of three supervised exercise groups.


One group did high-intensity interval training three days a week: They pedaled on an exercise bike at their maximum speed for 4 minutes, before easing up for 3 minutes; they repeated that process four times. They also worked out more moderately — walking on a treadmill — twice a week.


A second group performed moderate aerobic exercise — using an exercise bike at a less-intense pace — five days a week, for 30 minutes. They also did some light strength-training four days a week.


The third group performed strengthening exercises only, two days a week.


After 12 weeks, all of the groups were showing positive changes — younger and older exercisers alike, the researchers found.


People who performed moderate aerobic exercise boosted their fitness levels — the body’s ability to supply blood and oxygen to working muscles. And the improvement was greater for older adults, who generally started out with lower fitness levels than younger people.


Meanwhile, people who performed strength-training — alone or with aerobic exercise — increased their muscle strength.


The interval-training group showed only small gains in strength. But the training improved mitochondrial function in the muscles, especially among older adults.


Dr. Chip Lavie is medical director of cardiac rehabilitation and prevention at the John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute in New Orleans.


He said this is a “great” study that demonstrates the benefits of different forms of exercise.


According to Lavie, it adds to other evidence that high-intensity interval training is “probably the best form of exercise.”


Many studies, he said, have found that interval training beats moderate aerobic exercise when it comes to improving fitness and the heart’s structure and function.


“It would be ideal to get more people to do high-intensity interval training,” Lavie said, “and it’s possible for more-motivated individuals.”


But, he added, the reality is, many people may not have the motivation or ability.


In that case, Lavie advised finding a moderate regimen you can live with — such as 30 to 40 minutes of walking or using an exercise bike or elliptical machine most days of the week.



SOURCES: K. Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D., professor, medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.; Chip Lavie, M.D., medical director, cardiac rehabilitation and prevention, and director, exercise laboratories, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, New Orleans; March 7, 2017, Cell Metabolism


News stories are written and provided by HealthDay and do not reflect federal policy, the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Popular posts from this blog

Pain in the Quadratus Lumborum Muscle

A majority of the population have at some point experienced low back pain in their lifetimes. Although low back pain is recognized to result from numerous conditions or injuries on the lumbar spine, muscle strains such as a quadratus lumborum muscle strain, are believed to be a leading cause for the recognizable symptoms of pain and discomfort.
The quadratus lumborum muscle is a sizable muscle in the shape of a triangle, located deep on each respective side of the lower back. The role of the wide muscular tissue is to grant mobility to the lumbar spine in sequence for the torso to move laterally from side to side as well as extend and stabilize the lower spine to improve posture. When this muscle is strained or pulled, the symptoms can restrict movement on the lower back and since the muscular tissue is so extensive, recovery from this type of injury usually requires more time and patience to fully heal.


Quadratus Lumborum Syndrome V.S. Facet Joint Syndrome
When symptoms of back pa…

Achilles Tendon Injury

Achilles tendonitis is a medical term used to describe a condition resulting in irritation of the large tendon, the Achilles tendon. Found in the back of the ankle, this condition is recognized as a common cause for injury among athletes. Excessive use of the Achilles tendon results in inflammation together with swelling and pain.
The development of Achilles tendonitis can be associated with two important factors, most frequently among athletes, which are, lack of flexibility and over-pronation. With age, the tendons will begin to lose flexibility, just the same as other tissues in the body. This change causes the tendons to become more rigid and more vulnerable to injury. For some people, the ankle may roll too far downward and inward with each step they take. This is called over-pronation, which places more stress on the tendons and ligaments of the foot, contributing to injury if not corrected.
Achilles tendonitis may also develop from other factors. An increase in an athlete’s …

5 Common Causes for Shoulder Pain

The shoulders are the most mobile joints in the human body. Because the ball of the humerus is designed to be larger than the shoulder socket that holds it, the shoulders need to be supported by muscles, tendons, and ligaments to secure them in a stable or natural position. Since the shoulder can be unstable, it is often a site for many common complications. Below are 5 common causes of shoulder pain and their associated symptoms.
Rotator Cuff Tear
Rotator cuff tears within the shoulder are a very common type of shoulder injury. The rotator cuff consists of a set of four muscles: the supraspinatus, the infraspinatus, the subscapularis, and the teres minor. All of these muscles are attached to the bones of the shoulders by tendons, which purspose is to support, stabilize, and grant the arm movement to move up, down and rotate. The rotator cuff ensures that the arm remains in the shoulder socket. Damage or injury from an accident or gradual wear and tear can result in inflammation to t…

Today's Chiropractic

Location Near You

Community: Google+ Followers 10K+